Federal Reserve Centennial

federal reserve system centennial logoThe Federal Reserve System was created on December 23, 1913, when President Woodrow Wilson signed the Federal Reserve Act into law. Before the new central bank could begin operations, the Reserve Bank Operating Committee, consisting of Treasury Secretary William McAdoo, Secretary of Agriculture David Houston and Comptroller of the Currency John Skelton Williams, had the task of building a working institution from the basic framework of the new law. By November 16, 1914, the 12 regional Reserve Banks were open for business.

Today, the Federal Reserve sets the nation’s monetary policy, supervises and regulates banking institutions, maintains the stability of the financial system, and provides financial services to depository institutions, the U.S. government and foreign official institutions.

The Fed at 100: A Commemorative Video
Interviews of Fed employees and external stakeholders examining the role and responsibilities of the System and how our work affects the lives of people both inside and outside the Fed

Centennial Resources

Federal Reserve Centennial GatewayCentennial Gateway offsite
Biographies, images, and essays on key events in the Fed's 100-year history
Historical Beginnings coverHistorical Beginnings... The Federal Reserve
The history of the U.S. banking system, the banking problems of the 19th century, and the legislation that led to the formation of the Federal Reserve System
A Bank, A Man, A RegionA Bank, A Man, A Region pdf
An overview of the Boston Fed during Edward J. McCarthy's seven decades of service
Panic of 1907 coverPanic of 1907 pdf
How the failure of one commodity speculator in October 1907 triggered a nationwide bank run

 

 

 

Video: Signing Ceremony, Board of Governors offsite
December 16, 2013
Commemoration of the signing of the Federal Reserve Act with past and present Federal Reserve System officials

Frequently Asked Questions offsite
Some Frequently Asked Questions (FAQs) related to the Centennial commemoration and the inventory of historical collections


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